Retic Off

Posted on 6th June 2014 in Controllers, Local Knowledge

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In case you weren’t aware all reticulation needs to be switched off as of June 1st and until Aug 31st.

For most controllers it is a simple matter of turning the dial to ‘off’ and ensuring the sprinklers don’t run. If you continue to run your retic over winter then you will get fined around $150.00

If you aren’t sure how to switch the system off then give us a call and we’ll try and talk you thru it over the phone.

 

Why We Recommend MP Rotators Over Other Rotary Nozzles

Posted on 16th December 2013 in Installations, nozzles

Sure – this is Hunter propaganda, but in my experience MPs have proven themselves to be top quality nozzles over time. It is not uncommon for me to return to a house I installed MP rotators in after 3-4 years and see them performing as well as the day we installed them.

My Retic Won’t Shut Off

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For people with Hunter X Core Controllers this is one of the most common issues and it arises because the controller is incorrectly programmed.

What happens is the system comes on at 5.00am (or whenever you have set it for) runs thru the whole cycle and then does it again… and again… and again…

The problem is more than one identical start time being set.

By that I mean that start time 1 is 5.00am, start time 2 is 5.00am and then start time 3 is 5.00am. For some reason this confuses the machine and causes it behave in this way.

The reality is you only need one start time to run a program, so if you have this issue then ensure you only have one time set.

When Retic Won’t Switch Off

Posted on 20th November 2013 in solenoids, What's Going on There?

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There can be a few causes of this, but its rare that it happens.

Typically when a system doesn’t have a master valve any time a solenoid fails the retic will leak, but its very unusual when there is a master valve.

I was at a property this week where the retic ‘wouldn’t shut off’.

When I got there the ball valve that isolates the retic had been closed because it wouldn’t stop running on station 1. I opened the ball valve and nothing happened… So obviously it had shut off…

I checked the controller and it was an X Core with some a dodgy dial that wouldn’t do what it was supposed to. So I replaced it, thinking that this was the source of the problem. It needed replacing anyway and when I tested it, all worked well.

Then I got a call that night telling me the retic was stuck on again…

Odd.

So I dropped in and checked the new controller and it was working fine – BUT – the retic was definitely stuck on station 1.

I had to do another job so I turned it off at the ball valve and went away for a few hours. When I returned and turned it on the water flow had stopped.

The only thing that could cause this was a faulty solenoid both on 1 and the master – perhaps solenoids that were slow closing or remaining partially open. I located solenoid 1, a Rainbird, and noticed that the bleed screw was just a little loose, so I tightened it and that fixed that. I went to the master and the bleed screw was loose on there as well.

Weird…

I have no idea how these screw get loose, but its worth knowing that this happened without any interference. No one messed with them.

If your retic won’t shut off and you have a master valve then check your bleed screws.

Hopefully tonight all will be well

The Busy Season For Reticulation

Posted on 10th November 2013 in General

Usually late September to early october is the busy season for those of us in reticulation.

The watering bans are lifted, the warmer weather hits and people venture outside to discover their sprinklers don’t work, or their control box display has gone blank.

We have had an unusually long winter this year so the ‘switch on’ hasn’t happened for most until just this last fortnight – which has meant that we have all been flat out with a deluge of calls.

If you have landed on this page because you are in that boat then please give us a call, but be aware we won’t be able to get there tomorrow!

 

The Great Australian Backyard

Posted on 6th October 2013 in bore, General, Installations, Installing, Sir Walter Turf

Back in the olden days when blocks of land were large the typical backyard was big enough for a full length cricket pitch as well as the Hills Hoist.

These days most backyards are compact and good for a game of chess…

Last week we were in Lancelin and installed a bore, retic and turf in this property. We finished it on Thursday and it looks sensational.

The sprinklers used are top quality MP Rotators (3000 series nozzle) on 2 stations and the 320m of turf was Sir Walter Buffalo. Its  a huge backyard ready for the kids to get out the footy.

 

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Heinrich gets stuck into the 8 pallets of lawn we had delivered. Check out the quirky Hobbit house in the next block…

 

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Finished product – looking great

Sprinkler Run Times

Posted on 30th September 2013 in General

If you aren’t sure of how long your sprinklers are supposed to be on for then here is a graphic from the Water Authority with some approximate times.

 

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How Much Do I Pay for Water in Perth?

Posted on 16th September 2013 in bore, General

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The cost of Perth water increased another 10% in 2013 so it is more important than ever that you are careful with the use of your reticulation. It is estimated that up to 50% of household water usage is attributed to the sprinkler system so it pays not to waste any of that water.

One option I encourage people to consider is the installation of a bore. While the upfront cost of around $4K is significant if you plan on being in the property long term then this is an option well worth considering.

The price of water* is tiered i.e. the more you use, the more you pay.  This is to help encourage the careful use of water.

  • 0 – 150 kL costs $1.381 per kL
  • 151 – 500 kL costs $1.841 per kL
  • Over 500 kL costs $2.607 per kL

*Ref: http://www.watercorporation.com.au/my-account/rates-and-charges

 

 

What Are My Watering Days?

Posted on 19th June 2013 in General

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Flow Control Solenoid Valves

Posted on 11th June 2013 in Products, solenoids

So what’s the difference between an ordinary solenoid valve and one with flow control?

 

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Basically its the large ‘dial’ in the middle that you can turn to adjust the rate at which water flows thru the valve. You may choose to use one of these if you have a small station and do not want you retic operating at full capacity.

For example some people have a small veggie patch that needs some very specific watering. Rather than adding the veggies patch to the lawn station or to other garden beds they would irrigate it separately. In that instance it may be necessary to reduce the flow and use this type of valve.

Any alternative is to use an inline tap to reduce to flow.