Two Rocks Reticulation

Posted on 12th September 2014 in Installations, Installing

tworocks

tworocks2

tworocks3

When it comes to retic in Two Rocks, especially on an established property, you need to be ready for some serious digging and some hard yakka. As the suburb name suggests there is a lot of rock up there and sometimes you just have to go around what you can’t go through.

I did this job last week, installing a whole retic system – 200m of PVC –  to an established property. There were lots of roots and rocks to contend with but also some nice long sandy patches. Thankfully the faithful trencher didn’t let me down and I managed to get it all done in the day.

Without the trencher there would be 2-3 days of work in this one. I used a combination of MP rotators and precision nozzles to get it all done on 3 stations.

Changing Seasons And a Great Time to Install Turf

Posted on 2nd April 2014 in Installations, Installing, Sir Walter Turf, Turf

turflay

This cooler weather is the perfect time to install some turf.

It will grow well before winter, you can avoid the heat and your lawn will look great.

Give us a call for a free quote. We can usually give you a pretty good estimate over the phone and then can measure up if we are looking like going ahead

The Great Australian Backyard

Posted on 6th October 2013 in bore, General, Installations, Installing, Sir Walter Turf

Back in the olden days when blocks of land were large the typical backyard was big enough for a full length cricket pitch as well as the Hills Hoist.

These days most backyards are compact and good for a game of chess…

Last week we were in Lancelin and installed a bore, retic and turf in this property. We finished it on Thursday and it looks sensational.

The sprinklers used are top quality MP Rotators (3000 series nozzle) on 2 stations and the 320m of turf was Sir Walter Buffalo. Its  a huge backyard ready for the kids to get out the footy.

 

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Heinrich gets stuck into the 8 pallets of lawn we had delivered. Check out the quirky Hobbit house in the next block…

 

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Finished product – looking great

X Core Hybrid Controllers

Posted on 2nd November 2012 in Controllers, Installing, Never Seen That One Before, Products

This is the control box you would use if you have no access to mains power. It is totally battery operated and does not require a 240v supply.

I came across one of these in Butler this week and only realised when we arrived that it was a hybrid. The trick here is that none of your regular 24v solenoids will work with it, so because we were laying retic and turf that day it meant a frantic search to locate some DC latching solenoids.

In the end Total Eden in Balcatta had 3 we needed so it was long drive there and back to make it work. I’m not sure why anyone would use one of these in Suburbia where power is not an issue. The other thing to remember with these controllers is that the solenoids are expensive. You will pay $80.00 for each solenoid rather than the regular $30.00 so it adds to the cost of the job.

I believe you can use regular Hunter valves and simply change the coil to DC latching, but I haven’t tested that method.

Next time I’ll be making a note of whether the controller is AC or DC!

 

14.9

Posted on 27th September 2012 in Installations, Installing, Just For Fun

That’s how warm it got in Perth today…

So much for spring… We were out laying lawn and doing some fix ups and getting pretty cold and wet along with it!

 

Phil compacts the turf

 

Coby dishes out the sandwiches!

Village Green Turf

Posted on 25th May 2012 in Installing

 

I had a request yesterday for ‘Village Green Turf’, a variety I have heard of but never used before. I did some research and discovered that it is a form of kikuyu but one that has some improved features. See the chart below for its strengths and then refer to the brochure here for more info. We can supply and lay Village Green Turf for you – just call now for a free measure and quote.

 

How to Install Sprinklers by The Kerb

Posted on 13th May 2012 in Installations, Installing, Products, sprinklers

 

The first time I did some DIY retic I tried to install my kerbside sprinklers by digging along the line of the kerb.

Big mistake!

After 10 minutes I had all but given up. You see the soil along the kerb is actually roadbase. It is hard and rocky and not easy digging. If you want to install sprinklers along the kerb then dig a trench one metre away from the kerb and parallel to it and then ‘t’ off to the point where you need sprinklers. You will still need to do some hard digging but it will save you a lot of effort and you will do the job right.

The other tip with kerbside sprinklers is to make sure they are well below kerb height – because they will get driven over. If you’re lucky they won’t get damaged, but if they are even sticking up a little bit then expect to replace them regularly.

I get calls from one client a few times each summer to replace the same sprinkler. Personally I reckon it would be easier just to sink the sprinkler a bit lower…

Quoting on Reticulation and Turf Without being There

Posted on 28th March 2012 in Installations, Installing, Local Knowledge

Sometimes its possible for us to give you a very accurate quote on your retic and turf needs without viewing the site.

Ideally we would come and check it out with you and discuss your needs, but in the first instance we can look at your home on www.nearmap.com and talk with you on the phone about what is required.

If you are happy with the ball park figures then we can meet you and discuss things more fully.

Most nearmap images are up to date to within around a month and can be used to give a good guide to what work is required. We work anywhere from Two Rocks down to Scarborough and would be happy to quote on your needs.

What Does it Cost to Install Reticulation?

Posted on 16th March 2012 in Installations, Installing, sprinklers

We offer some general guidelines on our home page here, but the truth is it can vary considerably depending on the type of soil we need to dig in, the ease of accessibility and the simplicty or otherwise of the job. A new house is fairly easy to give an estimate for and we suggest that typical costs to expect are:

  • Retic cut in by licensed plumber $180.00 + GST
  • Hardwiring of controller $160.00 + GST
  • Wireless rain sensor (only compulsory if you wish to get a lawn watering exemption) $150.00 + GST
  • Electronic Controller $200.00-$400.00 + GST (depending on what is chosen)
  • Installation / pipes / sprinklers etc see below

To give you an idea of what to expect a very rough ball park figure for a 4 x 2 home on a 600m block with 5 or 6 stations is usually around $2600.00 + GST including plumber and sparkie. These prices do vary with the seasons so if you ‘need it done now’ over summer chances are that with any retic business you will pay a premium. If you can wait until winter then you will probably save 10-20%.

A front install on this kind of home would be around $1500.00 + GST and a rear install usually around $1100.00 + GST.

If your home is established and we need to dig through grass, tree roots and flower beds then we will charge extra for that, but a straightforward installation is usually in the ballpark of the prices above.

But the best way to go is to get in touch and we can then meet up onsite, walk thru the plans and get a clear picture from there.

 

How To Lay Sir Walter Softleaf Buffalo Turf

Posted on 16th March 2012 in Installations, Installing, Turf

If you have been considering laying some turf then we can certainly recommend Sir Walter softleaf buffalo as a brilliant product that looks great when it goes down and that will continue to look good if maintained correctly.

Below is a job we did yesterday in Yanchep where we installed reticulation and then laid 200sqm of Sir Walter.

It came up looking stunning and the client was very pleased with the result.

The key to getting it right is preparation.

You will need to bring in at least 40ml of good soil, and then finish the level 40ml below your paving to ensure the turf sits neat and tidy.

Some good organic fertiliser spread before laying and then a good soak will get the ground ready for the turf to be laid.

From there we lay the largest slabs around the perimeter and try to minimise the use of smaller pieces of turf as these dry up easier.

Once laid and cut in to the sprinklers and shape of the land we run the compactor over it to ensure the roots make good contact with the soil.

Another drink and the retic set for the watering exemption and you’re pretty much done…

 

 

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